You can travel with pets after Brexit, but it’s become more complicated and more expensive. 

EU pet passports that were issued in Great Britain will no longer be valid from 1 January; owners will need an animal health certificate instead. EU Passports issued in the EU or Northern Ireland can still be used.

According to the gov.uk website:

  • When travelling to an EU country or Northern Ireland, your pet needs:
  • a microchip
  • a valid rabies vaccination
  • an animal health certificate unless you have a pet passport issued in an EU country or Northern Ireland
  • tapeworm treatment for dogs if you’re travelling directly to Finland, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Norway or Malta

These requirements also apply to assistance dogs.

How to get an animal health certificate:

You must take your pet to your vet to get an animal health certificate no more than 10 days before you travel.

The certificate must be signed by an ‘official veterinarian’ (OV), so check your vet can issue animal health certificates. If they cannot, they should help you find someone who can.

To get the certificate, you’ll need to take proof of your pet’s:

  • microchipping date
  • vaccination history

Your pet’s animal health certificate will be valid after the date of issue for:

  • 10 days for entry into the EU or Northern Ireland
  • 4 months for onward travel within the EU
  • 4 months for re-entry to Great Britain

Repeat trips to the EU:

  • Your pet will need a new animal health certificate for each trip to an EU country or Northern Ireland.
  • Your pet will not need a repeat rabies vaccination so long as its rabies vaccinations are up to date.
  • Your dog will need tapeworm treatment for each trip if you’re travelling directly to Finland, Ireland, Malta, Northern Ireland or Norway.

Check the rules of the country you’re travelling to for any additional restrictions or requirements before you travel.

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